Subclinical Hypothyroidism: How Functional Medicine Can Help

Subclinical Hypothyroidism: How Functional Medicine Can Help


Hello this is Ryan from Apollo Medical
Associates. I’m here again with Denver Hager and Denver’s going to talk to us
today about subclinical hypothyroid. Now Denver, this is definitely past my level of expertise so I need you to
break this down for me in terms of what it is, what does it look like, and then
how do we treat it. Subclinical hypothyroid can present in several different ways
but basically we have somebody who is symptomatic with thyroid symptoms:
hair loss, fatigue, weight gain, bowel changes, and their labs by traditional
Western standards are normal. So everything looks normal but they’ve got
that constellation of symptoms that you experience. Anything else that would kind
of be a red flag or trigger them that they have subclinical hyperthyroid?
No, I mean most of the time they’ve been to their family doc or several providers
and been told that their labs are normal, so then in that case we might try an
empirical treatment and keep them within a physiological range but optimize that
so using Armour thyroid which is desiccated pig thyroid or using Cytomel
which is a synthetic t4 and we will do a trial of life and then use the labs kind
of as guardrails to keep the person healthy and safe but also to mitigate
their symptom. And are you seeing the same symptom presentation of
the men or women, does it present similarly or perhaps differently at all?
More frequently in women, but yeah it is both men and women another aspect of it
is going back to World War One they looked at America and they saw pockets
of guys entering the military with lower IQs. They said “Hmmm, wonder why that is,” and then they went
and researched and a lot of these guys had goiters or swollen thyroids and so
they started doing their epidemiological study
to figure out why and it was iodine deficiency so that is when the
government started iodizing the salt. So today we’re all using our fresh
ground pink Himalayan salt and it doesn’t have the iodine so we are
starting to see some iodine deficiency. Iodine can help but there are there are
levels of iodine available over-the-counter that can be detrimental,
so taking too much iodine will help you feel good for a very short time and then
it’s going to create other problems and put you into a hyper thyroid state and
then eventually burn out thyroid reserve. One of the most common things I see here
is what’s called Hashimoto’s and Hashimoto’s is autoimmune thyroid and
there is very strong correlation between gluten and gliadin molecule even in non
celiac patients and what’s called molecular mimicry so the body starts to
develop antibodies to gliadin and then turns around and the thyroid is of a
similar protein structure and we start to attack our own thyroid. So often in
Western traditional medicine people do not look at thyroid antibodies because
they don’t feel that it changes how they’re going to treat it. Well if the
thyroid antibodies are high there are things we can do that may depending on
how long it’s been bring those down. Often I’ll see patients with Hashimoto’s
and we’re able to treat them without putting them on medication. If somebody’s
had Hashimoto’s for many years then they may also still require
medication. Okay well I appreciate your time this morning Denver I think we’ve
learned a lot about subclinical hypothyroidism, as well as the Hashimoto
presentation. I think you said it’s more of the autoimmune hyper thyroid
presentation. Hy-PO -thyroid-ism. so I’m learning a lot today so thank you
very much we’ll see you next time

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