Dispelling Injection Safety Myths

Dispelling Injection Safety Myths


In this short video, we will review some key points
of safe injection practices. Safe injection practices ensure the
safety of patients, healthcare personnel and others. As defined by the World Health
Organization, a safe injection does not harm the recipient, does not expose the provider to avoidable
risks, and does not result in waste that is
dangerous for the community. There have been numerous outbreaks of bloodborne
and other pathogens reported in the United States due to
lapses in safe injection practices. Here are some examples of the dangerousness
misperceptions that healthcare providers might have regarding safe injection
practices. One myth is that contamination of
injection devices is limited to the needle and that removing the needle makes the
syringe safe for reuse. The truth is that once they are used,
both the needle and the syringe are contaminated and must be discarded. A new sterile syringe and a new sterile
needle should always be used for each patient and to access medication vials. Another myth is that IV tubing or valves
can prevent backflow and contamination of injection devices. The truth is that everything from the
medication bag to the patient’s IV catheter is a single interconnected unit. Distance from the patient, gravity, or
even positive infusion pressure do not ensure that small amounts of
blood won’t contaminate the supply. Another myth is that if you don’t see blood
in the IV tubing or injection equipment there isn’t a risk of
cross-contamination. The truth is the pathogens including
Hepatitis C and B viruses and HIV can be present in sufficient quantities
to produce infection without any visible blood. And finally, the last myth is that single-use vials
with large volumes that appear to contain multiple doses can be used for more than one patient. The truth is that single-use vials
should not be used for more than one patient regardless of the vial size. The following practices will help
safeguard patients from transmission of bloodborne and other pathogens. Needles and syringes are single-use devices. They should not be used for more than
one patient or reused to access medication vials. Once they are used, the syringe and needle are
both contaminated and must be discarded. Do not administer medications from
single-dose vials, ampoules, pre-filled syringes or intravenous bags to multiple
patients and never combine leftover contents for
later use. In general, limit the use of multidose vials
whenever possible. As you’ve heard, single-dose vials
should only be used for a single patient. In addition, if multidose vials are used
they should be dedicated to a single patient whenever possible. This adds an extra layer of protection
by minimizing the chance that a contaminated vial will be used on
another patient. Injection safety is every provider’s
responsibility. Every injection should be safe. Anyone should be able to stop a
procedure if they think it isn’t safe. Please go to the website on your
screen for more information and thank you for doing your part for making every injection
safe.

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